New York City Health Atlas

Credits

NYU RESEARCH TEAM

Jessica Athens
Maria Barbara Tagliaferro
Hannah Park
Andrew Vinson
Additional support provided by NYU Langone Medical Center’s Community Service Plan Coordinating Council


WEBSITE DESIGN

L+L


WEBSITE DEVELOPMENT

Andy Glass
Brett Schwartz

New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Bureau of Vital Statistics

Gretchen Van Wye
Mary Hyunh

Correlation Is Not Causation

In statistics, correlation is a measure of association between two numeric variables. The strength of correlation between two variables is represented by the correlation coefficient, represented by the abbreviation r. Correlation coefficients range between -1 to 1.

Though the correlation coefficient indicates the strength of an association, it does not provide information about whether the change in one variable is caused by the other.

For example, if the correlation between adult smoking prevalence and child poverty is 0.7—a strong correlation—we cannot say either that adult smoking causes child poverty or, inversely, that child poverty causes smoking. We only know that as one of these variables increases, the other tends to increases.